Info Sheet


Background and Context:

Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

Last September of the year 2000, leaders of 189 countries met at the United Nations (UN) in New York and endorsed the Millennium Declaration, a commitment to work together to build a safer, more prosperous and equitable world. The Declaration was translated into a roadmap setting out eight timebound and measurable goals to be reached by 2015, known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), namely:

Goal 1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
Goal 2. Achieve universal primary education
Goal 3. Promote gender equality and empower women
Goal 4. Reduce child mortality
Goal 5. Improve maternal health
Goal 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
Goal 7. Ensure environmental sustainability
Goal 8. Develop a global partnership for development

Trends on MDG GOALS 4&5:

This year’s report on progress towards The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) published by the United Nations (UN) highlights several milestones related to MDG 4&5:

  • While the World Health Statistics 2012 Report of the World Health Organization (WHO), released in May 2012, includes the good news about significant reductions in maternal and child deaths (…in 20 years, the number of maternal deaths has decreased from more than 540,000 deaths in 1990 to less than 290,000 in 2010 – a decline of 47%. One third of these maternal deaths occurring in just two countries – India with 20% of the global total and Nigeria with 14%).
  • Looking into the Millennium Development Goals: 2012

Progress Chart compiled by the United Nations Department of Economics and Social Affairs (UN-DESA), indicates that target was already met or expected to be met until Year 2015 for Goal 4 by Northern Africa, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean; and for Goal 5 (Reduce Maternal Mortality by three quarters) by Eastern Asia, and Caucasus and Central Asia.

  • The chart also indicates that progress is still insufficient to reach the target if prevailing trends persist for Goal 4 by Sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Asia, Oceania, and Caucasus and Central Asia; and for Goal 5 (Reduce Maternal Mortality by three quarters) by Northern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Western Asia, Oceana, and Latin America and Caribbean.

Reasons/Solutions why MDGs 4&5 are not achieved in some regions:

In sum, of the MDG goals, Goal 4 (Reduce child mortality) and Goal 5 (Improve
maternal health, and the reduction of Maternal mortality) may not be met in the above-mentioned regions. The UN-DESA report cites reasons/solutions for the problem:

  • Weak health systems are one of the biggest reasons for maternal and child mortality. A lack of health care workers, clinics and equipment means many women and children don’t have access to basic health services including immunisations and care for expectant mothers. In contrast, nearly two thirds of successful deliveries in the developing world are attended by skilled health personnel.
  •  Millions of lives could be saved if known technologies were available to mothers and children in the world’s poorest countries. If women had access to basic maternal health services, 80% of maternal deaths could be prevented. Many of the solutions are extremely affordable, especially for children. Childhood vaccines are one of the most cost-effective ways to save lives and prevent disease for a lifetime and could help prevent more than 2.5 million deaths each year.
  • Investing in the health of mothers and children could have a lasting impact in the world’s poorest countries. Children who lose their mothers are five times more likely to die in infancy than those who do not. Healthy children, meanwhile, are more likely to attend school and learn better in their classes, which will help them grow up to be productive as adults.

Birthing Clinics needed:

For many years, the World Health Organization (WHO) promoted the training and capacity building of Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) as a good solution. Lately, the recommendation has shifted to deliveries in birthing clinics that should be equipped with birthing facilities and minimum birthing equipment. The WHO further recommends that the birthing clinic personnel should as well be trained to recognize conditions that are beyond their primary care level and be willing to refer or consult promptly with medical doctors (MDs) for the more complicated patients that require advanced treatment. There is an important need for training, support, supervision and regulation of these birthing clinics to ensure safe practice.

What do Birthing Clinics need?

In the establishment of Birthing Clinics, the midwives and nurses were readily identified as the ready and available medical personnel to provide the needed health service of birth deliveries. While these birthing clinics were encouraged to be established, still very little funds were allocated to ensure that these birthing clinics will be established in key strategic areas with all the support that they need to enable them to deliver the services needed.

Key Questions:

  • Has the curriculum of the midwives been revised to prepare them for the critical task of establishing and managing the birthing clinics?
  • Have governments provided funds for the training/re-training of these midwives to provide them with the needed skills for this additional and critical task expected to most of them?
  • Has there been a review of the legislation/policies needed to support these birthing clinics and the birthing attendants (primarily the nurses and midwives)?
  • Are all the health delivery actors/providers/agencies united in their view of how the heath service be provided?
  • Finally, are the policies/legislation and action agenda gender responsive?
  • Are the policy/legislation and action agenda framers aware of the gender issues attendant to the problem/solution?
  • In the design of the clinics, are gender considerations included/considered?

What will the Global Congress of Women in Politics aim to achieve by adopting the theme: Maternal and Infant Mortality: a Gender issue, a Community Responsibility?

  • This forum will provide the opportunity for parliamentarians, Ministries of Health, and other law-making bodies to dialogue broadly with birthing facility owners and administrators, health policy makers, the academe, specially the midwifery and nursing schools, midwives, nurses, doctors and other health care professionals in order to discuss lengthily about existing problems in maternal and child mortality, assess the gaps, and formulate policies/ legislation and action agenda in order to establish safe birthing facilities and support them.
  • Every year, an estimated 358,000 mothers die from pregnancy related causes and 7.6 million children die before their fifth birthday. The vast majority of maternal and child deaths occur in the world’s poorest countries.
  • Women in sub-Saharan Africa have a one in 31 chance of dying in childbirth, compared to only one in 4,300 for women in developed regions. Weak health systems are one of the biggest reasons behind this enormous gap. A lack of health care workers, clinics and equipment means many women and children don’t have access to basic health services including immunisations and care for expectant mothers.
  • Millions of lives could be saved if known technologies were available to mothers and children in the world’s poorest countries.
  • If women had access to basic maternal health services, 80% of maternal deaths could be prevented.
  •  Many of the solutions are extremely affordable, especially for children. Childhood vaccines are one of the most cost-effective ways to save lives and prevent disease for a lifetime and could help prevent more than 2.5 million deaths each year.
  • Investing in the health of mothers and children could have a lasting impact in the world’s poorest countries. Children who lose their mothers are five times more likely to die in infancy than those who do not. Healthy children, meanwhile, are more likely to attend school and learn better in their classes, which will help them grow up to be productive as adults. How will the community take responsibility for MDG 4&5?
  • In the poorest countries, where the MDG 4&5 are unmet, the community should be mobilized to help.
  • This will make it easier for the state and the stakeholders to fill in the gaps
  • What is needed is the resolve to recognize the issue as a gender issue which the community can solve if all will come together and help
  • The Forum will invite women leaders from poor communities who will share their experience in this area.

Objectives

Specifically, the Congress will have the following objectives:
Overall Purpose:To provide a forum for women legislators, leaders and
health care providers at all levels in formulating gender-responsive legislation,
policies and programs to promote maternal and child health.

Specific Objectives:

a) to understand the phenomenon of maternal and infant mortality, its causes,
impacts, and its implications in the context of maternal and child health;
b) to review and examine the gender aspects of maternal and child health and
formulate appropriate policies/actions to address these;
c) to identify/define the global and national policy and action agenda for
parliamentarians, policy advocates, women leaders and health care providers in formulating gender-responsive legislation, policies and programs to promote maternal and child health.
d) to define the roles women and communities can play in addressing maternal
and infant mortality at the global, national and sub-national levels; and

Papers

The discussion on gender and maternal and child health will be organized around identifying the challenges to action, as well as defining the appropriate responses to effectively address the phenomenon of Maternal and Infant Mortality as a Gender Issue – and a community responsibility’.

Inputs to the discussion will be collected and organized around: 1) geographic location; and 2) types of actions. Cross cutting these discussions will be the identification of gaps in policies national and local, levels in formulating gender-responsive legislation, policies and programs to promote maternal and child health.

The focus of the discussions will revolve around defining and elaborating policies and actions to reduce maternal and child mortality by formulating gender responsive legislation, policies and programs to promote maternal and child health.

Health care professionals, along with their national and international associations, have a significant role in the advancement of maternal, newborn
and child health (MNCH). Healthcare providers who have experience working on the front line are often placed in the unique position of educating, training and preparing the environment for change in addition to influencing national
healthcare policy.

Health professionals working together at the national and community levels can make a significant contribution towards the achievement of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We believe that strengthening national and local commitment to improving access and quality of care is an essential component of promoting safe motherhood, newborn health and child survival. We believe this is best achieved by fostering partnerships among health care professional associations and their individual members.

Organizations and all the other participants are welcome to share papers for distribution during the congress. These papers should be emailed in advance so that they can be included in the CD of resource materials that will be distributed to the participants during the congress.

Congress Venue

Asian Institute of Management
Makati City, Philippines

Knowledge Fair/Exhibition on Maternal and
ChildHealth

A Knowledge Fair/Exhibition on ‘Maternal and Infant Mortality a Gender Issue – a community responsibility’ will be organized at the venue of the Congress: the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Hotel. Participating organizations are invited to exhibit their materials for display or for sale. Those who are interested should contact the secretariat to make their booth reservations. There will be minimal charges for the rental of the booth. This is aside from the space that will be made available for all organizations to display and distribute materials that you would like to share with the other participants.

Expected Output

Gender Responsive Legislative/Action Agenda on the reduction of Maternal and Infant Mortality

About the Organizer

Global Network of Women in Politics

The Global Network of Women in Politics is a project of the Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP). It is a loose network of organizations and individuals who are committed to the agenda of transformation in leadership, politics and communities.

This network is committed to be the forum for Women Parliamentarians to meet every 3-4 years and learn about relevant gender issues that will enable them to promote gender responsive legislation.

From the beginning, CAPWIP has recognized the need for broad international support to effectively promote women’s participation in politics. The Center studied previous efforts to create a global network for WIP. They found that some of the factors that hindered the creation of an effective network were that efforts had been confined either to a small group of elite women or research institutes and/or that it had a narrow focus of interest. Realizing that CAPWIP has no real model for a global network, the group decided to work slowly toward this ultimate objective.

Time and again, CAPWIP took advantage of opportunities to talk about what it
was doing. One such break was the 1994 Taipei Global Summit on Women’s Leadership in Politics. The summit brought together women interested in WIP and key CAPWIP personalities, among them Supartra Masdit, Kanwaljit Soin, Sylvia Ordonez, Irene Santiago, Sochua Leiper, Annette Lu Hsiu Lien, Leticia Ramos Shahani, Kao Tien Shang, Anne Summers, and Solita Monsod. International luminaries included Bella Abzug, Monica Barnes, Joaquima Alemay, Betty Bigombe and Kazimiera Prunskiene. The group agreed to work towards forming a global network and to meet at the Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) for the Beijing World Conference to be held in New York in March 1995.

At the PrepCom, CAPWIP posted its invitation for a “Planning Workshop for the Preparatory Activities in Beijing for the Organization of the Global Network of Women in Politics.” Hosted by the African-American Institute, the 17 March workshop was attended by a large group of women which included: Christine Pintat (Inter Parliamentary Union); Anita Amlen (Swedish Federaton of Liberal
Women); Jytee Lindgard (National Council of Women in Denmark); Sdalwa Sharawy Gomaa (Social Research Center, Egypt); Malena de Montis (Centro Para La Participation Democratica y El Desarrollo, Nicaragua); Nadia Raveles (Women’s Parliament Forum, Surinam); Dr. Pam Rajput (Punjab University); Slote Wananisan (Fiji Mission to the UN); Dr. Ilina Sen; NandiniAsad (Working Women’s Forum, India), and Ayesha Khanam (Bangladesh Mahila Parishad). The African-American Institute, which had planned a WIP meeting in Botswana, later, hosted the Planning Meeting for the Global Network of WIP held in Beijing.

Several steering committees were formed that would produce Regional WIP Platforms for Action for the Beijing Women’s Conference. Focal points were established for the different regions: Nadia Raveles for Africa, Jytee Lindagard for Europe-North America, CAPWIP for Asia-Pacific, Salwa Gomaa for West Asia, and Malena de Montis for Latin America-Caribbean.

It was also agreed that a Global Network of Women in Politics (GLOBALNET) would be organized with CAPWIP serving as the permanent secretariat. In 1995, GLOBALNET was formally incorporated with CAPWIP serving as the permanent secretariat.

Since 1995, The Global network of Women In Politics (GLOBALNET) has organized three Global Congresses on current international issues related to gender. The last Global Congress was held in 2008 with the topic of Gender in Climate Change. It was the first of its kind addressing the gender issues related to climate change. In 2013, the Fourth Global Congress of Women in Politics will have for its theme ‘Maternal and Infant Mortality a Gender Issue – a community responsibility’.

Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)

The CENTER FOR ASIA-PACIFIC WOMEN IN POLITICS (CAPWIP) is a nonpartisan, non-profit and non-governmental regional organization dedicated to promoting equal participation of women in politics, governance and decisionmaking.

CAPWIP was established in 1992, twenty years ago, by a group of women from the Asia-Pacific region who have defined their paradigm for change as:

Politics that is both TRANSFORMED and TRANSFORMATIONAL.
TRANSFORMED because…
it uses power to create change, to develop people,
and to build communities;
it is non-hierarchical and participatory in its
structures and processes; and
it accords priority to the disadvantaged sectors,
such as the poor grassroots women in rural and
urban areas and indigenous women;
TRANSFORMATIONAL because…
it is development-oriented, issue-based,
and gender-responsive;
it seeks economic, social, and political equity between sexes
and among sectors; and
it builds a society that is just and humane and
a way of life that is sustainable.

CAPWIP operates through a network of national affiliates clustered into five subregional groupings: Central Asia, East Asia, Pacific, South Asia and Southeast Asia. These sub-regional coordinating focal points and national affiliates are autonomous organizations actively involved in women’s political empowerment in their respective countries.

CAPWIP supports its network through technical assistance in organizational and program planning, training, research and information sharing, advocacy and networking. CAPWIP receives administrative and program support through voluntary contributions from its board members and grants from bilateral and multilateral aid agencies such as the Asian Development Bank (ADB), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Asia-Pacific Gender Equality Network (UNDP-APGEN), Regional Programme on Governance in the Asia-Pacific (UNDP-PARAGON), Southeast Asia Gender Equity Programme of the Canadian International Development Agency (SEAGEP-CIDA), United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

CAPWIP’s programs on training include developing modules and training programs for women’s leadership and responsible citizenship based on the framework of transformative leadership and conducts trainer’s training for women’s political empowerment, transformative leadership and gender responsive governance.

CAPWIP provides trainings to women and men involved in:

  • Electoral politics (in all levels: national, provincial, city/municipality)
  • The bureaucracy (in all levels: national, provincial, city/municipality)
  • Political parties (officials and members)
  • Training institutes (government, private sectors and non-government)
  • The development of governance policies, programs and projects
  • Working with NGOs, civil society groups interested in gender, governance and leadership; or
  • Women and men who are simply interested in the question of gender, governance and leadership.

Secretariat

Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)
4227-4229 Tomas Claudio Street Baclaran, Parañaque City, Metro Manila,
Philippines
Tel: (632) 8516934; Tele Fax 😦 632) 8522112; mobile phone +639178403711
Email: capwip@capwip.org; capwipcongress@capwip.org; capwip2013@capwip.org
Web: http://www.capwip.org; http://www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org
Link to CAPWIP 4th Global Congress: https://capwipglobalcongress.wordpress.com

Target Participants / Who are invited

  • UN and UN agencies
  • UN affiliate organizations
  • Women parliamentarians
  • Women in decision-making and governance
  • International and local midwife associations
  • Midwives, nurses, doctors
  • Midwifery schools
  • Birthing facility owners/administrators
  • Healthcare associations
  • Funding/donor organizations/agencies
  • Healthcare professionals
  • Healthcare providers
  • Health professionals
  • Members of media

Note: The policy of “first come – first served” will be applied in selecting the participants from among the applicants. Therefore, it is best that registration is
made at the earliest possible time.

Congress Cost per participant

  • Congress Cost Per participant with Twin Sharing Accommodation: One thousand five hundred fifty five US Dollars (US$1,550)
  • Congress Cost Per participant with Single Room Accommodation: One thousand seven hundred fifty US Dollars (US$1,750)

These fees are inclusive of:

  • Congress fees
  • Transfer in and out of the hotel
  • Accommodations at the designated hotels
  • All congress materials
  • All meals during the Congress
  • Accommodations (excluding meals) for one night before the congress (October 16, 2013)

This fee, which does not include airfare and airport terminal fees, is nonrefundable and must be paid in advance as soon as the reservation to the congress is confirmed. Congress fee payments should be sent/remitted to:

Account Name : Center for Asia-Pacific Women in
Politics or CAPWIP
Account Number : 710 271000417 4
Account Type : U.S. Dollar Savings Account
Bank’s Name : Metropolitan Bank and Trust
Company (METROBANK)
Bank’s Address : Magallanes Branch, Paseo de
Magallanes, Magallanes Village,
Makati City, PHILIPPINES
Swift Code : MBTCPHMMXXXX

Unfortunately, scholarships are not available from the organizers. You are encouraged to seek your own funding from various donor/funding agencies or your own institutions. The organizers will rely solely on the congress fees to fund the congress expenses.

Please email us a copy of the wire transfer/remittance document as soon as funds have been remitted. Also, bring this document to the Congress for verification. Payments upon arrival are NOT allowed.

All participants must confirm their attendance on or before August 1, 2013.
If we get fully booked before this date, you will be informed. This is the reason
why you are all encouraged to book as early as possible. All accommodation
types are available on a first-come first-served basis. If you are alone and you
would like to request for a twin accommodation, we will inform you if we can pair you with another participant, otherwise, you may have to pay for a single room.

Please send all registration forms to:

Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)
4227-4229 Tomas Claudio Street Baclaran, Parañaque City, Metro Manila, Philippines
Tel: (632) 8516934; Telefax 😦 632) 8522112; Mobile Phone +639178403711
Email: capwip@capwip.org; capwip2013@capwip.org; capwipcongress@capwip.org
Web: http://www.capwip.org; http://www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org

  • Accommodations beyond the congress period can be arranged.
  • Participants will have to pay for the hotel charges in advance to secure the booking. These will also be remitted to the CAPWIP account.

Congress Schedule

October 17-19, 2013

The Congress is scheduled on October 17-19, 2013. Participants are required to arrive one day before (Oct. 16) the start of the Congress and leave the day after the last Congress day (Oct 20). This fee only includes the accommodation for the October 16, 2013 all meals for October 16 is for the personal account of the participants. Depending on your departure schedule, all meals for the October 20, 2013 except for the breakfast will be on the personal account of the participants. Meals for personal account of the participants will have to be paid in cash every time you incur them at the congress venue. Charging of personal accounts in restaurant outlets of the hotel will not be allowed.

Medium of Instruction

English is the medium of Instruction. No translation will be available.

Congress Venue

Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Hotel, Makati
City, Philippines

Accommodation

The participants’ accommodation will be booked at the Congress venue (Asian
Institute of Management (AIM) Hotel) and other hotels in the same vicinity, all
within walking distance from the Congress venue. For purposes of organization, the assignment of the hotels will be on a “first come first served” basis. The first that will confirm and pay their fees will be given accommodations at the hotel venue.

Food

The following meals, LUNCH, SNACK and DINNER, will be served at the Congress venue, the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) Hotel. Breakfast will
be served at your respective hotels (if you happen to be billeted at a hotel other than the official venue of the congress). We will be serving a variety of
international dishes. We will also be serving one “halal” dish and one vegetarian dish with every meal.

Fee

US$1,750 per person : single room accommodation
US$1,550 per person : twin sharing accommodation

Please remit to:

Account Name : Center for Asia-Pacific Women in
Politics or CAPWIP
Account Number : 710 271000417 4
Account Type : U.S. Dollar Savings Account
Bank’s Name : Metropolitan Bank and Trust
Company (METROBANK)
Bank’s Address : Magallanes Branch, Paseo de Magallanes, Magallanes Village, Makati City, PHILIPPINES
Swift Code : MBTCPHMMXXXX

includes:

  • Program fee (handouts, supplies, materials and Secretariat/
  • organizing expenses.)
  • Accomodations for October 16,17,18,19, 2013)
  • Three (3) lunches and six (6) snacks

does not include:

  • Travel to and from your countries
  • Accommodations beforte October 16 and after October 19, 2013)
  • Meals for October 16 (the day before the congress) and meals for October 20, 2013 (except for breakfast)
  • All incidental travel expenses including airline, airport taxes and fees
  • Travel insurance
  • Visa fees

policy on refunds:

  • Fees paid for the training are strictly non-refundable.
  • Fees must be paid in advance as soon as the reservation to the training is confirmed.

To ensure that payment made is credited for the enrollment of a participant, the remittance should specify the name of the participant for which the fund is intended. You can request the bank to do this for you. The bank usually asks for additional details and purpose of the remittance.

Thereafter, please send us a scanned copy of the remittance documents immediately so that we can finalize your bookings. Kindly present the original copy of the remittance documents to the Secretariat during the Congress opening.

All participants must confirm their attendance one month before the Congress
schedule. However, all accommodations at the congress venue are available on a first-come first-served basis. The Organizers reserve the right to use other accommodations it has arranged for the other participants who will not be accommodated at the congress. Please send all registration forms to:

The Training SECRETARIAT

Center for Asia Pacific Women in Politics (CAPWIP)
4227-4229 Tomas Claudio Street Baclaran, Parañaque City, Metro Manila,
Philippines
Tel: (632) 8516934 Tele Fax :(632) 8522112; Mobile Phone: +63917 840 3711
E-mail: capwip@capwip.org; capwip2013@capwip.org; capwipcongress@capwip.org
Web: http://www.capwip.org; http://www.onlinewomeninpolitics.org
Link to CAPWIP 4th Global Congress: https://capwipglobalcongress.wordpress.com

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